Umesh “Umi” Venkatesan, PhD

Institute Scientist
Director of the Brain Trauma and Behavior Laboratory (BraTBehavior)
Umesh “Umi” Venkatesan, PhD
Bio

Dr. Venkatesan’s scientific program centers on aging with moderate-to-severe TBI (msTBI), and in particular, the proposed links between chronic msTBI and neurodegeneration. A considerable portion of his research has focused on functional neuroimaging to characterize evolving and stable functional neural network alterations in msTBI, which may be associated with remote neurologic complications. Insights gained from functional imaging can also be used to ask targeted behavioral questions, and his work in this area has involved complex cognitive processes underlying memory and social functioning. More recently, he has developed an interest in pre- and post-injury biopsychosocial factors contributing to outcome trajectories and the long-term health of individuals with brain injury.

Dr. Venkatesan received a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Johns Hopkins University and a doctoral degree in clinical psychology from Pennsylvania State University. He completed a pre-doctoral internship in clinical neuropsychology at Brown University and a postdoctoral fellowship within the VA Boston Healthcare System before joining MRRI in 2019.

Research Interests
  • Clinical assessment and imaging of cognition in TBI
  • Prediction and detection of cognitive decline
  • Biopsychosocial perspectives in post-injury recovery or decline
Publications

Book Chapter:

Venkatesan, U.M., & Hillary, F.G. (2019). Functional connectivity within lateral posterior parietal cortex in moderate to severe traumatic brain injury. Neuropsychology. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1037/neu0000553

Peer-reviewed journal articles:

2020

Venkatesan, U.M., Margolis, S.A., Tremont, G., Festa, E.K., & Heindel, W.C. (2020). Forward to the past: Revisiting the role of immediate recognition in the assessment of episodic memory. Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, 42(2), 160-170. doi: 10.1080/13803395.2019.1697210

2019

Lancaster, K., Venkatesan, U.M., Lengenfelder, J.L., & Genova, H.M (2019). Default mode network connectivity predicts emotion recognition and social integration after traumatic brain injury. Frontiers in Neurology: Neurotrauma.

Venkatesan, U.M., & Hillary, F.G. (2019). Functional connectivity within lateral posterior parietal cortex in moderate to severe traumatic brain injury. Neuropsychology. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1037/neu0000553

 2017

Venkatesan, U.M., Festa, E.K., Ott, B.R., & Heindel, W.C. (2017). Differential contributions of selective attention and sensory integration to driving performance in healthy aging and Alzheimer’s disease. Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, 24(5), 486-497. doi: 10.1017/S1355617717001291

Bernier, R.A., Roy, A., Venkatesan, U.M., Grossner, E., Brenner, E., & Hillary, F.G. (2017). Examining neural network representation of task and rest following moderate and severe traumatic brain injury. Frontiers in Neurology. doi: 0.3389/fneur.2017.00297

2015

Venkatesan, U.M., Dennis, N.A., & Hillary, F.G. (2015). Chronology and chronicity of altered resting-state functional connectivity after traumatic brain injury. Journal of Neurotrauma, 32(4), 252-264. doi: 10.1089/neu.2013.3318

2014

Hillary, F.G., Roman, C.A, Venkatesan, U.M., Bajo, R., Rajtmajer, S.M., & Castellanos, N.D. (2014). Hyperconnectivity is a fundamental response to neurological disruption. Neuropsychology, 29(1), 59-75. doi: 10.1037/neu0000110

2011

Medaglia, J.D., Ramanathan, D.M., Venkatesan, U.M., & Hillary, F.G. (2011). The challenge of non-ergodicity in network neuroscience. Network, 22(1-4), 148-153. doi: 10.3109/ 09638237.2011.639604